19 Best Questions You Can Explore In A Psychology Thesis

By definition, psychology is the study of behavior and the mind. The subject is one many college students find themselves taking, whether as a requirement or as an elective. Psychology explores how the mind works, how the mind connects to the body, and that hard to answer question, why. At some point, a psychology student will need to write a paper. Sometimes they are given the topic, and sometimes the professor lets the student pick. Here are some psychology thesis topics for psychology students to consider.

  1. Nature vs. nurture – Does nature or nurture determine someone’s behavior?
  2. Right or wrong – Is murder ever justified?
  3. Good vs. Evil – Does true, pure evil exist?
  4. Motivation – Is motivation external or internal?
  5. Addiction – What creates an addict?
  6. Technology and Society – How has technology impacted human social interactions?
  7. Bullying – What are the short-term and long-term effects of bullying?
  8. Bullying – How is a bully created?
  9. Depression – Why are some people more prone to develop depression than others?
  10. PTSD – How can soldiers and their loved ones cope with post-traumatic stress disorder?
  11. Stress – How can you manage stress?
  12. Sleep – What impacts do the quantity and quality of sleep have on a person’s day?
  13. Violence – What factors contribute to creating a mass shooter?
  14. Eating Disorders – How and when does a diet turn into an eating disorder?
  15. OCD – How and when does OCD develop?
  16. Media and Sex – How has the media impacted the view of sex among the teen audience?
  17. Intelligence – Is intelligence fixed or can it be changed?
  18. Memory – How can one improve memory and recall?
  19. Therapies and Treatments – When should you seek professional mental health?

Each topic above is based on issues many people deal with on a daily basis. When choosing a topic to write about, be sure there is plenty of information available, whether it is online, at your local library, or in journals. Start with an Internet search and branch out from there. The topic should be broad enough to find information, but not too broad as to become overwhelming. Focus your ideas on one or two central questions. Regardless of the topic you choose, it should be something you have a personal interest in, whether it affects you or someone you know, or is just something you want to learn about. Select what speaks to you.

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